Singing Makes you Feel Good

Updated: Mar 17


I have always believed in the Healing Art of Music which is why I started the Foundation with the same name, several years ago. I have always done my best to create a safe space for my students to discover their vocal instrument! It's okay to Kak! I have witnessed the transformation of students when they walk into my studio and what they are like when their session is over. It is amazing; they begin to bloom in front of my eyes. I found the following article very interesting....


Medically reviewed by Debra Rose Wilson, Ph.D., MSN, R.N., IBCLC, AHN-BC, CHT — Written by Rebecca Joy Stanborough, MFA on November 10, 2020


People love to sing. Whether or not they can carry a tune, people seem to understand that there’s something positive — something healthy — in the act of raising their voices in song.

In fact, there’s solid scientific evidence to prove that singing is, in fact, good for your body and your mind.


Here, according to science, are 10 key benefits of raising your voice in song.


1. Relieves stress

Singing appears to be a stress-reliever. A study measured the amount of cortisol, the stress hormone, in participant’s saliva before and after they sang.

Researchers in that study found that the amount of cortisol was lower after singing, an indication that people felt more relaxed after they’d belted out a tune.


2. Stimulates the immune response

There’s some evidence that singing may boost your immune system and help you fight off illnesses.

Those who sang showed higher levels of immunoglobulin A, an antibody your body secretes to help you fend off infections. Listening to music (without singing along) reduced stress hormones but didn’t stimulate the body’s immune system.


3. Increases pain threshold

When you sing in a group, whether it’s a large choir or a smaller group, the act of collective singing causes your body to release endorphins. This hormone can help promote positive feelings, and even change your perception of pain.


4. May improve snoring

Regular singing may change the way you breathe, even when you’re not singing. Researchers in a 2008 study interviewed the spouses of choir members, along with the spouses of people who don’t sing. The researchers found that significantly fewer choir members snored. This led them to recommend regular singing as a potential treatment for snoring.


5. Improves lung function

Because singing involves deep breathing and the controlled use of muscles in the respiratory system, it may be beneficial for certain lung and breathing conditions. While singing doesn’t treat or cure any of these conditions, you may benefit from gaining strength in your respiratory muscles. Singing also increases the amount of oxygen in your blood, research shows. In addition to the pulmonary benefits, singers also experience improved mood and a greater sense of social connection.


6. Develops a sense of belonging and connection

When you sing together with others, you’re likely to feel the same kind of camaraderie and bonding that players on sports teams experience.


7. Enhances memory in people with dementia

People with Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia experience a gradual loss of memory. Studies have shown that people with these conditions were able to recall song lyrics more easily than other words.


8. Helps with grief

Singing in a group doesn’t just help you with physical pain; it may also help with the emotional pain you feel after you’ve lost someone you love.


9. Improves mental health and mood

A 2018 study done in the United Kingdom evaluated 20 people in a singing program known as The Sing Your Heart Out project. The participants included people with mental health conditions, as well as the general public. Researchers found that the participants reported improvements in their mental health, mood, sense of well-being, and feeling of belonging as a result of these singing workshops.


10. Helps improve speaking abilities

Singing stimulates multiple areas of the brain at the same time. This may enable people with an impairment in one part of the brain to communicate using other areas of their brain.

Singing can also prolong the sounds in each word, which may make it easier to pronounce them.


For more information about Sherry Kennedy - Songwriter | Vocal Coach | Recording Artist

Click HERE to schedule an appointment.

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